Psalms 131: Hope from Outside


Psalms 131 is awfully short, but we learn a lot about pride.

Psa 131:1  A Song of degrees of David. LORD, my heart is not haughty, nor mine eyes lofty: neither do I exercise myself in great matters, or in things too high for me.

Psa 131:2  Surely I have behaved and quieted myself, as a child that is weaned of his mother: my soul is even as a weaned child.

Psa 131:3  Let Israel hope in the LORD from henceforth and for ever.

It seems like the third verse is somewhat disconnected from the first two. The first two talk about David trying to be humble. He is trying to keep his perspective right. We hear a lot in the Bible about being humble before God, and this passage seems to fit the theme perfectly. However, how do we connect that to the final verse about Israel trusting God?

I certainly agree that Israel should trust in God. That’s a no-brainer. Most of the Old Testament seems to be telling Israel that be they need to be coming back to God or remaining close with God. Again, this is a very popular topic, and we talked about it before.

I think that the main connection comes from the fact that when you are humble, you recognize that your hope is not in yourself. You are willing to say that you might not have every answer in the world, and you are willing to admit that you might be wrong at times.

If we have hope but not from ourselves, and then it necessarily has to come from somewhere else. Of course, if you don’t have any hope, then you don’t need a source for it. However, I think that most people put their hope in something, and David is advising that it would be wise for Israel to put their hope in God.

Obviously, this is not the most deeply developed argument. It is only three verses, but this is not a difficult point to take. If you are humble enough to realize that you are not your own hope and if you recognize that you do have some kind of hope in something, God is the best place to put that hope.

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Posted on March 23, 2014, in Psalms and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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