Blog Archives

Psalms 32: Why Do We Confess Our Sins?


I don’t know where you are at when you come to my blog, but you might possibly have a question about why Christians care so much about confessing sins to God. You can find a good answer in Psalms 32.

Psa 32:5  I acknowledged my sin unto thee, and mine iniquity have I not hid. I said, I will confess my transgressions unto the LORD; and thou forgavest the iniquity of my sin. Selah.

Notice that there is a sequence of events here. I acknowledged my sin and did not try to hide any of it. There is a confessional aspect there, and then God forgave the iniquity.

In other words, it seems as if the forgiveness of sins is a consequence of the confession. You can see this in other parts of the Bible as well.

1Jn 1:8  If we say that we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us.

1Jn 1:9  If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.

Pro 28:13  He that covereth his sins shall not prosper: but whoso confesseth and forsaketh them shall have mercy.

You might wonder why this is worth it. After all, doesn’t confessing seem embarrassing at times? When you do something wrong, it is not always easy to admit what you did. It might have been a really dumb thing that you knew you shouldn’t have done, but you did it anyway, and you really can’t believe that you had that lapse in judgment.

Is there some kind of benefit outweighs this embarrassment? After all, if we kept it quiet, we at least wouldn’t be embarrassed (although it is worth mentioning that God knows what you did before you tell him, so it is not like confession will be mind-blowing).

Here are the benefits.

Psa 32:1  A Psalm of David, Maschil. Blessed is he whose transgression is forgiven, whose sin is covered.

Psa 32:2  Blessed is the man unto whom the LORD imputeth not iniquity, and in whose spirit there is no guile.

We are going to be blessed by God. Again, I definitely do not mean financially necessarily. However, we are going to be doing the will of God, and as a result of that, we will be blessed.

Are the blessings from God worth the potential (yet irrelevant) shame that admitting what you did was wrong produces? I would think so.

Advertisements

Numbers 5: Confess to Mistakes


It is obvious that we all mess up. We all do things that we wish we had not done, and sometimes we harm other people when we mess up. Numbers chapter 5 explains how this was handled in Israel.

Num 5:6  Speak unto the children of Israel, When a man or woman shall commit any sin that men commit, to do a trespass against the LORD, and that person be guilty;

Num 5:7  Then they shall confess their sin which they have done: and he shall recompense his trespass with the principal thereof, and add unto it the fifth part thereof, and give it unto him against whom he hath trespassed.

Basically, if you harm someone else, you need to own up to it and make it right.

I think that this is a pretty good guideline for how we should handle these types of conflicts in our lives. If we harm someone else, he or she will probably not be very happy about it. However, it is much easier for everyone involved to confess the mistake right away.

It is more painful to find out something later. Then, it isn’t just a problem of whatever has been done, but it is also a problem of all the lying that has probably been done to cover up that offense.

Heb 13:18  Pray for us: for we trust we have a good conscience, in all things willing to live honestly.

We can only have a good conscience if we deal honestly with everyone around us. I know that this isn’t necessarily the uplifting Thanksgiving post that I probably should write on the day before, but it is incredibly important.

We are supposed to show people the love of Jesus here on earth. If we are lying to or deceiving our friends, our witness will not be as effective. Everything we do should ideally bring glory to God.

Leviticus 5: Confession Leads to Forgiveness


In Leviticus chapter 5, we have found another set of sacrifices for another set of sins. However, in my opinion, the most interesting part of this chapter lies in between the sin and sacrifice.

Lev 5:5  And it shall be, when he shall be guilty in one of these things, that he shall confess that he hath sinned in that thing:

Confessing that we have messed up is the first step to asking for forgiveness from God. Even though we don’t literally need to sacrifice animals like they did in the Old Testament, we need to confess our sins to God and He will be faithful to forgive us.

1Jn 1:9  If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.

Psa 32:5  I acknowledged my sin unto thee, and mine iniquity have I not hid. I said, I will confess my transgressions unto the LORD; and thou forgavest the iniquity of my sin. Selah.

In both of these instances, it is obvious that confession comes before forgiveness. While confession may obviously be intimidating because nobody likes to admit they did something wrong, God will always take us back like prodigal children.

We shouldn’t have wandered at the beginning, but isn’t it nice to know that we can be forgiven when we mess up? It would be inaccurate to take this as a free pass to do whatever we want, but we know that we can be forgiven from all of our sins.

Here is an excellent verse that speaks to the power of the forgiveness of God.

Mic 7:18  Who is a God like unto thee, that pardoneth iniquity, and passeth by the transgression of the remnant of his heritage? he retaineth not his anger for ever, because he delighteth in mercy.

Mic 7:19  He will turn again, he will have compassion upon us; he will subdue our iniquities; and thou wilt cast all their sins into the depths of the sea.

God will forgive us, and He will throw all of our sins into the depths of the sea. They will not be with us anymore, and God will have mercy on us.

So, starting from this idea of forgiveness that we find in Leviticus, we can follow the entire path to forgiveness which we don’t deserve, but because God is merciful, we can be forgiven.